Bio

Melissa Maalouf’s practice focuses on representing clients in a wide range of privacy, security, advertising, and e-commerce matters through counseling, responding to FTC and State Attorneys General investigations, and analyzing privacy/security risks associated with corporate transactions.

She regularly counsels providers of emerging technologies such as wearables, online marketplaces, and mobile applications in integrating “privacy-by-design” concepts into their products and services through the creation of appropriate consumer disclosures, website terms, internal policies and procedures, and consumer choice mechanisms. She also assists clients in analyzing legal issues related to using data from alternative sources, such as web scraping, aggregated financial data, and geo-spatial and drone data. She advises clients and defends them in federal and state regulatory enforcement actions regarding the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (“COPPA”) and online child safety considerations; the FTC’s native advertising and endorsement rules; other alleged violations of Section 5 of the FTC Act; the Fair Credit Reporting Act; Gramm-Leach-Bliley; and state and federal student privacy laws such as FERPA and SOPIPA.

Melissa works closely with clients to develop strategies, commensurate with their size and international footprint, for compliance with global marketing and cookies rules, consumer protection regulations, data protection laws, and international data transfer restrictions. She also advises on e-commerce issues such as consumer disclosures during the e-commerce flow, auto-renewal subscription regulations, and electronic signature laws.

Prior to joining ZwillGen, Melissa was an associate in the Communications, Media, and Privacy group at Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP, where she counseled clients on a variety of international and domestic data privacy, data security, e-commerce, and technology issues.

While at American University, Washington College of Law, Melissa served as the Editor-in-Chief of Volume 56 of the American University Law Review, received the Outstanding Graduate Award, and was a recipient of the Myer’s Society Scholarship.